David Bowie was perhaps one of the last true rockstars left. There is little that I can personally write about him that hasn’t already been said. He was born David Jones in 1947, began playing with the Konrads around 1962, and ultimately elevated the art of pop music beyond anything previously seen. Musicians have imitated him and fashionistas have drooled over him for decades. He was an icon of personal transformation, sexual expression, and liberation. He was a living reminder that you can be whomever you are, no matter who you are, and that’s amazing. And if you don’t like who you are, you can make up a character and be that for a while! Change your name, your accent, your hairstyle, your genre and be beautiful. The Man Who Fell to Earth blew my mind. Labyrinth did also, as did his Pontius Pilate, and The Hunger. The list is long.

Bowie died last night of cancer. He was 69 years old. We loved him, and we like to think that the Starman ascended so the rest of us, stuck down here in our grey cities, can invoke him like a great animal spirit when we need to be a bit more musical, more colorful, or just more fabulous. Here is a series of David Bowie images through the years as a tribute.

Bowie as the Thin White Duke for "Station to Station" (1976)

Bowie as the Thin White Duke for “Station to Station” (1976)

Ziggy Stardust (1972)

Ziggy Stardust (1972)

Bowie as "The Man Who Fell to Earth," (1976), Directed by Nicolas Roeg - Photo: Allstar/Cinetext/BRITISH LION

Bowie as “The Man Who Fell to Earth,” (1976), Directed by Nicolas Roeg – Photo: Allstar/Cinetext/BRITISH LION

“As was the case with Miles Davis in jazz, Bowie has come not just to represent his innovations but to symbolize modern rock as an idiom in which literacy, art, fashion, style, sexual exploration and social commentary can be rolled into one.” ~Rolling Stone magazine

Bowie adopted many guises throughout his career, his best known is probably his glam rock alter ego created for the album The Rise and Fall of Ziggy Stardust and the Spiders From Mars, in 1972. Photo: Rex Features

Bowie adopted many guises throughout his career, his best known is glam rock alter ego “Ziggy,” created for The Rise and Fall of Ziggy Stardust and the Spiders From Mars (1972). Photo: Rex Features

Bowie in 1974 for a performance of "Rebel, Rebel"

Bowie in 1974 for a performance of “Rebel, Rebel”

Ziggy Stardust preening in 1972

Ziggy Stardust preening in 1972

David Bowie with John Lennon at the Grammys in 1975

David Bowie with John Lennon at the Grammys in 1975

Bowie began his professional music career in the Konrads, seen here in 1963. Phota: Alamy

Bowie began his professional music career in the Konrads, seen here in 1963. Phota: Alamy

Bowie's 1971 Hunky Dory included the haunting Life on Mars? and Oh, You Pretty Things and redefined serious rock for the 1970s generation. Photo: Alamy

Bowie’s 1971 Hunky Dory included the haunting Life on Mars? and Oh, You Pretty Things and redefined serious rock for the 1970s generation. Photo: Alamy

Bowie married Angie Barnett in 1970 with whom he had a son, Zowie (now film director Duncan Jones). Image: Alamy

Bowie married Angie Barnett in 1970 and they had a son, Zowie (now film director Duncan Jones). Image: Alamy

Bowie's last performance as Ziggy Stardust (1973) known as "the retirement gig." Many thought he was ending his music career, but it was just the Ziggy persona he was leaving behind. Image: Getty

Bowie’s last performance as Ziggy Stardust (1973) known as “the retirement gig.” People thought he was ending his music career, but he was leaving “Ziggy” behind. Image: Getty

Having killed off Ziggy, 1973 brought Aladdin Sane, which cemented Bowie's reputation in the United States. Songs like Cracked Actor explored the dark, seedy side of fame, while Jean Genie was an old-fashioned rocker. As well as writing and performing, Bowie now branched out, producing Lou Reed's Transformer album and writing and producing Mott the Hoople's hit single, All the Young Dudes.

Having killed off Ziggy, (1973) Bowie brought Aladdin Sane. Songs like Cracked Actor explored the dark, seedy side of fame, while Jean Genie was an old-fashioned rocker. Bowie also branched out, producing Lou Reed’s Transformer album and writing and producing Mott the Hoople’s hit single, All the Young Dudes.

Bowie performing in 1976 Bowie for his album Diamond Dogs in 1974.

Bowie performing in 1976 for his album Diamond Dogs (1974).

Bowie and Mick Jagger performed a duet, a cover version of Martha and the Vandellas' Dancin' in the Street, for the 1985 Band Aid project and Live Aid. Image:  Rex Features

Bowie and Mick Jagger performed a duet, a cover of Martha and the Vandellas’ Dancin’ in the Street, for the 1985 Band Aid project and Live Aid. Image: Rex Features

Bowie released The Next Day after a 10 year hiatus (2013)

Bowie released the next day after a 10 year hiatus in 2013

Bowie during his last show as Ziggy Stardust at the Marquee Club in London (1973)

Bowie during his last show as Ziggy Stardust at the Marquee Club in London (1973)

With his first wife, Angela, and their son, Duncan Jones, known at the time as Zowie, after the singer received an award for “Ziggy Stardust” in 1974. Image: Getty

With his first wife, Angela, and their son, Duncan Jones, known at the time as Zowie, after the singer received an award for “Ziggy Stardust” in 1974. Image: Getty

Bowie and wife Angela in 1973

Bowie and wife Angela in 1973

Bowie performing for Blackstar

Bowie performing for Blackstar

 London in (1990) touring for “Changesbowie.”

London in (1990) touring for “Changesbowie.”

Bowie smitten by Princess Diana in 1993

Bowie smitten by Princess Diana in 1993

Bowie applying Ziggy makeup backstage.

Bowie applying Ziggy makeup backstage.

Bowie in Vienna (1996)

Bowie in Vienna (1996)

Bowie fortelling the 80's in 1974. H

Bowie fortelling the 80’s in 1974. H

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