The intention behind Sabine Banovic’s style of painting could be described the dimension between proximity and distance. Born in East Germany, she studied fine arts at the Central St. Martins College of Art and Design, and was a master class apprentice of Japanese artist Leiko Ikemura.

Today Banovic is based in Berlin, and creates haunting works reminiscent of the brush paintings of the Far East. Her work has been exhibited at Volta New York, Swab Barcelona, and the China Academy of Arts.

“I draw the thing which makes a musician contort his face while playing music.[…] the emotional content of the line, the relationships which are developed and then dissolved in the interplay between these impressions; all of this reflects a form of contemplation,“ she said. We are glad that she took the time to answer a few questions about her life, her aesthetic, and artistic process.

Visit her website at: Sabine Banovic

Schmelzpunkt (melting point)

Schmelzpunkt (melting point)

Sabine, thank you so much for taking the time to answer a few questions for “Beautiful Savage“. Your work is truly inspiring, so how would you describe your own aesthetic and artistic style?

It ́s important for me to create works in a sort of organic abstraction, that live on, once they are finished. All my pictures have to stay with me in my studio for a long time in order to find out, whether they can prevail.

Fischerin (fisherwoman)

Fischerin (fisherwoman)

Would you describe the process of creating a painting restorative or reassuring in any way and why?

Time plays a key role in my work and I allow things to develop. The process of creating is rather demanding than reassuring in many ways: I am always reinterpreting and reframing what comes into being, I rotate the canvas and choose new perspectives. In this iterative movement I am per- manently in attendance to deviate from my planned actions in favor of improvisation and vice ver- sa. Eventually I reach the point where nothing can be add anymore.

Frost (frost)

Frost (frost)

Do you have a special source where you get your inspiration from?

The source of my inspiration comes from within, from all those mental images and emotions, that! accumulate over time. They come originally from outside and emerge again from the subconscious.

Sturm (storm)

Sturm (storm)

Which is your special ritual by starting to work on a new painting?

My ritual is the change. Sometimes I have a plan, another time I start with a random event. ! I avoid solidifying recipes.

Which other artists inspire or influence you and your style?

Albrecht Dürer for example is a constant source of inspiration. I love the dealing with the spatiality of Asian ink paintings and I admire the the inner freedom of German Informel and also of Robert Motherwell and Pierre Soulages amongst others. Besides that, my work is influenced by the theo- ries of gestalt psychology and pattern language.

Gischt (spray)

Gischt (spray)

Pallmpset

Pallmpset

What is your attitude when it comes to colors?

I love colors. Also I work with colors a lot. But although most of my works are black and white only, one has to understand, that they origin from an imagination that in fact is polychromatic. Confron- ted with my work there is a moment when a space is opened between the piece and the viewer that gets colorfully rendered by the imagination of the viewer herself. And the same happens to me too: for my mind my pictures seem to be colored.

Dickicht (thicket)

Dickicht (thicket)

Thanks for answering our questions, is there anything else you want us to know

Kraft

Kraft

Interview: Sabine Banovic – All images courtesy

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