Within a world saturated with OOTD, #foodporn and selfies, there is other-worldly reprieve to be found on NASA’s Image of The Day. From alien landscapes to solar silhouettes, this visual diary of astronauts and galaxies is testament to the quiet, and at times, forgotten beauty of our Universe.

The archive reads as though a family album of portraits and holidays. Fireworks of stars being born, Christmas on the moon and Australia’s red lands from above as astronaut Scott Kelly passed overhead. At times, old images are unearthed, an event from years gone by that slips unnoticed from the front of the album to be re-remembered. Time though, seems to fade into insignificance, and us with it. Images taken at the furthest reaches of our vision show us our Universe as it was newly formed, a journey of light from over 14 billion years ago.

A moment of calm, a solace amongst the stars, NASA’s Image of The Day offers the most heavenly of escapes.

"Earthrise" Taken Christmas Eve, Dec. 24, 1968

“Earthrise” Taken Christmas Eve, Dec. 24, 1968

John Glenn, the first American to orbit the Earth on February 20, 1962 on the Mercury-Atlas 6 mission

John Glenn, the first American to orbit the Earth February 20, 1962 on the Mercury-Atlas 6 mission

International Space Station Flyover of Australia

International Space Station Flyover of Australia

"Celestial Fireworks" The cluster is surrounded by clouds of interstellar gas and dust - the raw material for new star formation.

“Celestial Fireworks” The cluster is surrounded by clouds of interstellar gas and dust – the raw material for new star formation.

Early Morning Space Shuttle Launch On Jan. 12, 1986 from Kennedy Space Center at 6:55 a.m. EST on the STS-61C mission.

Early Morning Space Shuttle Launch On Jan. 12, 1986 from Kennedy Space Center at 6:55 a.m. EST on the STS-61C mission.


NASA: Image of The Day – All images courtesy

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